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Yankees Choose Aaron Boone to Be Their Next Manager

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Aaron Boone, who had a 12-year major league career before becoming a baseball broadcaster, will replace Joe Girardi as the Yankees’ manager.

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Rob Latour/Invision, via Associated Press

Aaron Boone, who hit one of the most indelible home runs in Yankees history, will be the team’s next manager.

Boone, 44, was chosen on Friday over a field of five other candidates, according to a person with direct knowledge of the decision. The person was not authorized to discuss the move because the Yankees have not announced it.

Boone had been a broadcaster for ESPN and has never managed at any level. He will replace Joe Girardi, who went 910-710 in 10 years as Yankees manager and led the team to its last World Series championship, in 2009.

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Boone, 44, played 54 games for the Yankees, all in 2003, and was most closely associated with the Reds, whom he played for from 1997 to 2003. In 2012, he was grand marshal for the team’s opening day parade in Cincinnati.

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Tom Uhlman,/Associated Press

General Manager Brian Cashman declined to renew Girardi’s contract in October, cutting him loose despite the Yankees’ surprising surge to the American League Championship Series. Cashman said he had grown concerned about Girardi’s ability to connect with a young roster, and in Boone, he chose a candidate who has long been known as a skilled communicator.

Boone played 12 seasons in the majors and spent just three months with the Yankees in 2003. But he made his stay memorable, blasting a Tim Wakefield knuckleball into the left field seats in the bottom of the 11th inning of Game 7 of the A.L.C.S., defeating the Boston Red Sox and sending the Yankees to the World Series.

The Yankees signed Boone to return as their third baseman in 2004, but when he suffered a knee injury playing basketball that January, the team traded for Alex Rodriguez and cut Boone, costing him most of his salary. His honesty in reporting the injury accurately to the Yankees made a strong impression on Cashman at the time.

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