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Five ways to workout that don’t involve working up a sweat

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Summer has well and truly hit, and so too have rising temperatures. 

And while you might be committed to exercising on a regular basis, chances are the heat has you well and truly beat.

Though working up a decent sweat has its benefits, dripping in perspiration post-workout can be off-putting.  

Here, FEMAIL takes a look at five fun ways to exercise when the heat is on – none of which involve getting too hot and bothered. 

Finding the motivation to exercise when it's too hot can be hard, FEMAIL's roundup of alternative options offer the benefits without having to break a sweat (stock image)

Finding the motivation to exercise when it’s too hot can be hard, FEMAIL’s roundup of alternative options offer the benefits without having to break a sweat (stock image)

WALK, RUN AND JOG ON AN UNDERWATER TREADMILL

If cardio is an important part of your routine but you’re craving the coolness of a pool, why not try a combination of both? An underwater treadmill.

Aquatic treadmills, as they are more formally known, allow people to exercise on a treadmill that’s submerged in a pool. It’s an especially helpful form of exercise for those who are recovering from an injury. 

According to Fast Lane Pools, a site in Sydney offering the exercise alternative, you can walk, jog or run on an underwater treadmill, and burn as many calories as you can on land.

The website claims that as well as offering a cardio workout, there are added benefits too including an increased range of motion, and less impact on joints.

Underwater treadmills: The exercise form keeps you cool while giving you a cardio-based workout (stock image)

Underwater treadmills: The exercise form keeps you cool while giving you a cardio-based workout (stock image)

Underwater treadmills: The exercise form keeps you cool while giving you a cardio-based workout (stock image)

DANCE-INSPIRED FITNESS

If you’ve been following fitness trends, you’ll know dance-inspired workouts are nothing new.

While most classes are solidly designed to up your heart rate, Xtend Barre is a form of exercise that will not only sculpt but will leave you looking lean and long. 

Using the principles of Pilates and ballet, the workout – though not strictly a sweat-free option – focuses on creating strength and tone at the barre. 

It’s also a firm favourite among the Australian fashion pack with models Jesinta Franklin and Jessica Gomes both claiming it’s one of their preferred ways of working out.

And just to debunk any misconceptions, you don’t have to be a dancer, said Xtend Barre’s Drummoyne studio owner Sara Czarnota.

Speaking to Body & Soul, Ms Czarnota said: ‘The workouts are designed for every body and fitness level. Our goal is to help each person find their best dancer body.’

Xtend Barre isn't entirely sweat-free however its larger focus is on strengthening and toning

Xtend Barre isn't entirely sweat-free however its larger focus is on strengthening and toning

Xtend Barre isn’t entirely sweat-free however its larger focus is on strengthening and toning

NAP YOUR WAY TO YOUR DREAM PHYSIQUE 

If the idea of taking in a 45-minute nap ‘class’ fills you with more joy than you could possibly express, then your exercise prayers may well have been answered.

Napping classes, or napercise, is the latest wellness trend to hit our shores via the United Kingdom.

And while the classes sound as though they may be little more than just taking some time out, they’re actually designed to promote optimal health and well-being.

Napping classes are designed to give busy people some much-needed time out to recharge  

Napping classes are designed to give busy people some much-needed time out to recharge  

Napping classes are designed to give busy people some much-needed time out to recharge  

Some of the benefits of power napping include increased energy, focus and a higher level of productivity. 

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, a Brisbane studio trialled the 45-minute napping classes earlier this year, and interest has been steadily growing.

‘So many busy people don’t get enough sleep, so these classes are a great way to reinvigorate, rejuvenate and increase productivity with a power nap,’ Alexis Fenton, marketing manager at Inspirecycle, said.

Benefits of napercise include increased energy, focus and a higher level of productivity

Benefits of napercise include increased energy, focus and a higher level of productivity

Benefits of napercise include increased energy, focus and a higher level of productivity

YOGA AND WINE

The pairing of yoga and wine couldn’t sound more perfect, and it is actually a legitimate form of exercise – in Sydney at least.

Each Saturday at 11.30 am, yoga and wine classes are held on-site at a trendy inner-Sydney location: Handpicked Cellar Door.

The sessions, which cost $35 a pop, offer an hour of yoga followed by a wine tasting that includes six specially chosen wines by the company’s onsite sommelier. 

Because class sizes are small – only ten spots are available per session – bookings are essential.

Yoga and wine sessions are held each Saturday in Sydney at the Handpicked Cellar Door

Yoga and wine sessions are held each Saturday in Sydney at the Handpicked Cellar Door

Yoga and wine sessions are held each Saturday in Sydney at the Handpicked Cellar Door

ACROBATICS-INSPIRED CLASSES

If you’re looking for a less-conventional way to work out, slacklining, which takes its inspiration from tightrope walking, could be an ideal choice.

Slacklining involves performing a series of exercises on a narrow, flat line of webbing suspected between two anchors low to the ground.

It’s similar to tightrope walking except that the line is, as the name implies, slack instead of tight. This makes it especially difficult to maintain balance.

Slacklining is an exercise form which takes inspiration from tightrope walking except the line is, as the name implies, slack instead of tight (stock image)

Slacklining is an exercise form which takes inspiration from tightrope walking except the line is, as the name implies, slack instead of tight (stock image)

Slacklining is an exercise form which takes inspiration from tightrope walking except the line is, as the name implies, slack instead of tight (stock image)

According to Slackline Australia’s website the many benefits of slacklining it that it improves posture, stability, core strength, focus and mental relaxation.  

And because it’s portable, it’s entirely possible to set up a slackline between two trees you can practice your moves in the shade.